Art 3

This list is representative of the materials provided or used in this course. Keep in mind that the actual materials used may vary, depending on the school in which you are enrolled, and whether you are taking the course as Independent Study.

For a complete list of the materials to be used in this course by your enrolled student, please visit MyInfo. All lists are subject to change at any time.

Scope & Sequence : Scope & Sequence documents describe what is covered in a course (the scope) and also the order in which topics are covered (the sequence). These documents list instructional objectives and skills to be mastered. K12 Scope & Sequence documents for each course include:

Course Overview

Following the timeline of the K12 History program, third grade Art lessons introduce students to the art and architecture of the Renaissance throughout Europe, including Italy, Russia, and Northern Europe. Students will:

  • Extend their knowledge of elements and principles of art, such as form, texture, and symmetrical balance
  • Draw, paint, and sculpt a variety of works, including selfportraits, landscapes, and still life paintings
  • Investigate artworks from Asia, Africa, and the Americas
  • Create artworks inspired by works they learn about, using many materials and techniques—after studying da Vinci's Mona Lisa, students use shading in their own drawings, and they make prints showing the features and symmetry of the Taj Mahal
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Course Outline

The Building Blocks of Art

  • Classify artworks as portrait, self-portrait, landscape, still life, genre, painting, sculpture, or architecture
  • Identify and describe the difference between representational and abstract artworks
  • Identify colors or color schemes as primary, secondary, intermediate, complementary, warm, or cool
  • Describe the purpose of an artist's sketchbook

Good-Bye Middle Ages, Hello Renaissance: 1300–1400s

  • Describe characteristics of or facts about early Renaissance art or architecture, such as Gattamelata by Donatello and Brunelleschi's Dome
  • Describe characteristics of or facts about Medieval European and Byzantine art or architecture, such as the Cathedral of Notre Dame, Paris and Byzantine Madonna and Child on a Curved Throne
  • Explain that classical Greek and Roman art and architecture inspired early Renaissance artists

The Renaissance in Italy: 1500s

  • Describe characteristics of or facts about Italian Renaissance art or architecture, such as The Last Supper by Leonardo da Vinci, Tombs of Guiliano and Lorenzo De Medici by Michelangelo, The Small Cowper Madonna by Raphael, and Portrait of a Man by Titian
  • Describe events in the lives of Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, and Sofonisba Anguissola, and characteristics of their art

The Renaissance in Northern Europe: 1500s

  • Describe characteristics of or facts about Renaissance art or architecture in northern Europe, such as Self-Portrait by Albrecht Dürer, Henry VIII by Hans Holbein the Younger, Hunters in the Snow by Pieter Brueghel the Elder, and St. Basil's Cathedral in Russia
  • Describe events in the lives of Albrecht Dürer and Pieter Brueghel the Elder, and characteristics of their art

Baroque and Rococo Art: 1600–1700s

  • Describe characteristics of or facts about Baroque or Rococo art or architecture, such as David by Gian Lorenzo Bernini, Self-Portrait by Judith Leyster, Self-Portrait by Rembrandt, and Prince Balthasar Carlos on Horseback by Diego Velázquez
  • Describe events in the lives of Judith Leyster and Rachel Ruysch, and characteristics of their art

Asia and Africa: 1500–1700s

  • Describe characteristics of or facts about Japanese, Chinese, Indian, or African art or architecture, such as Act II of Chushingura by Utamaro, a Ming porcelain jar, the Taj Mahal, and a Benin plaque from Africa

American Indians: 1500–1700s

  • Describe characteristics of or facts about American Indian art, such as an Aztec calendar stone, an Inca toucan sculpture, and a Haudenosaunee wampum belt

Colonial America: 1600–1700s

  • Describe characteristics of or facts about Colonial American art or architecture, such as an American Windsor chair and a teapot by Paul Revere
  • Describe how the desire for European luxuries affected Colonial American art
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Number of Lessons and Scheduling

45 minutes

Total Lessons: 72

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K12 Scope & Sequence documents for each course include:

  • Course Overview (as seen above)
  • Course Outline
  • Lesson Time and Scheduling