Intermediate Art: American A

This list is representative of the materials provided or used in this course. Keep in mind that the actual materials used may vary, depending on the school in which you are enrolled, and whether you are taking the course as Independent Study.

For a complete list of the materials to be used in this course by your enrolled student, please visit MyInfo. All lists are subject to change at any time.

Scope & Sequence : Scope & Sequence documents describe what is covered in a course (the scope) and also the order in which topics are covered (the sequence). These documents list instructional objectives and skills to be mastered. K12 Scope & Sequence documents for each course include:

Course Overview

Following the timeline of the K12 History program, Intermediate Art: American A introduces students to the artists, cultures, and great works of art and architecture of North America, from pre-Columbian times through 1877. Students will:

  • Study and create various works, both realistic and abstract, including sketches, masks, architectural models, prints, and paintings
  • Investigate the arts of the American Indians, and Colonial and Federal America
  • Create artworks inspired by works they learn about, using many materials and techniques—after studying John James Audubon's extraordinary paintings of birds, students make bird paintings with realistic color and texture, and they make weavings inspired by the colors and patterns of Navajo blankets
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Course Outline

The Building Blocks of Art

  • Classify artworks as portrait, self-portrait, landscape, still life, genre, painting, sculpture, or architecture
  • Express reasons for preferring one work of art to another
  • Identify and describe the difference between representational, abstract, and non-representational artworks
  • Identify colors or color schemes in a work of art, such as primary, secondary, intermediate, complementary, warm, cool, and monochromatic
  • Describe the purpose of an artist's sketchbook

Native Peoples of the North

  • Describe characteristics of or facts about art of the American Indians of the north, such as Yup'ik finger masks, Eskimo serving dishes, and Northwest Coast totem poles
  • Identify symmetry in artworks

Native Peoples of the Southwest

  • Describe characteristics of or facts about art and architecture of the American Indians of the southwest, such as Southwest petroglyphs, Anasazi dwellings, Mimbres pottery, and Navajo weavings
  • Describe events in the lives of Navajo weavers or characteristics of their art

Native Peoples of the East

  • Describe characteristics of or facts about art of the American Indians of the east, such as Mound Builder ear spools and Woodland birch bark baskets

Native Peoples of the Plains

  • Describe characteristics of or facts about art of the American Indians of the plains, such as a Plains shirt, Nez Perce mask, and a Dakota saddlebag

Early American Art for the Home

  • Describe characteristics of or facts about early American art for the home, such as a sampler by Anna Bateman, a Pennsylvania Dutch decorated chest, Captain Samuel Chandler by Winthrop Chandler, and a stencil

America: Art for the New Nation

  • Describe characteristics of or facts about American Post-Revolutionary art and architecture, such as The Staircase Group by Charles Willson Peale, American Flamingo by John James Audubon, the Massachusetts State House by Charles Bulfinch, The Torn Hat by Thomas Sully, and Minuteman by Daniel Chester French
  • Describe events in the life of John James Audubon or characteristics of his art
  • Identify ways Federal architects were inspired by Classical architecture

America: Untamed Territory

  • Describe characteristics of or facts about American art of the 1800s, such as A View of the Mountain Pass Called the Notch of the White Mountains (Crawford Notch) by Thomas Cole; American Railroad Scene; Snow Bound by Currier and Ives; Rainmaking Among the Mandan by George Catlin; Thunder Storm on Narragansett Bay by Martin Johnson Heade; and a daguerreotype
  • Describe events in the life of George Catlin or characteristics of his art
  • Identify techniques artists use for showing the illusion of space in flat artworks
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Number of Lessons and Scheduling

45 minutes

Total Lessons: 72

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K12 Scope & Sequence documents for each course include:

  • Course Overview (as seen above)
  • Course Outline
  • Lesson Time and Scheduling