Art 2

This list is representative of the materials provided or used in this course. Keep in mind that the actual materials used may vary, depending on the school in which you are enrolled, and whether you are taking the course as Independent Study.

For a complete list of the materials to be used in this course by your enrolled student, please visit MyInfo. All lists are subject to change at any time.

Scope & Sequence : Scope & Sequence documents describe what is covered in a course (the scope) and also the order in which topics are covered (the sequence). These documents list instructional objectives and skills to be mastered. K12 Scope & Sequence documents for each course include:

Course Overview

Following the timeline of the K12 History program, second grade Art lessons introduce students to the art and architecture of ancient Rome, medieval Europe, Islam, Mexico, Africa, China, and Japan. Students will:

  • Examine elements and principles of art, such as line, shape, pattern, and more
  • Study and create self-portraits, landscapes, sculptures, and more
  • Create artwork similar to works they learn about, using many materials and techniques—after studying Winslow Homer's Snap the Whip, students paint their own narrative landscape and design stained glass windows inspired by the Cathedral of Notre Dame in Paris
back to top

Course Outline

Let's Get Started

  • Identify lines in artwork, such as The Great Wave off Kanagawa by Katsushika Hokusai
  • Identify different types of artwork, including paintings and sculpture
  • Differentiate between art that looks real and art that looks make-believe
  • Learn about the life of Katsushika Hokusai and the characteristics of his works

Shapes and Colors

  • Identify shapes and colors in artwork, such as The Harlequin's Carnival by Joan Miró
  • Describe how colors are mixed to make new colors
  • Learn about the life of Henri Matisse and the characteristics of his works

Let Me Repeat Myself: Patterns

  • Identify and describe patterns in artwork, such as Surprised! Storm in the Forest by Henri Rousseau
  • Learn about the life of Henri Rousseau and the characteristics of his works

How Artists See Animals

  • Identify and describe qualities of texture in artwork, such as A Young Hare by Albrecht Dürer
  • Differentiate between realistic and abstract artwork, such as American Flamingo by John James Audubon and Cat and Bird by Paul Klee
  • Identify examples of realistic and abstract sculpture, such as The Thinker by Auguste Rodin and Bird in Space by Constantin Brancusi

How Artists See People: Portraits and Self-Portraits

  • Identify and describe the characteristics of portraits and self-portraits, such as Head of Adam from the Sistine Chapel by Michelangelo
  • Learn about the life of Joseph Whiting Stock and the characteristics of his works

The View from Far and Near: Landscape and Still Life

  • Identify and describe the characteristics of landscapes and still life paintings, such as Peasants Under the Trees at Dawn by Jean Baptiste-Camille Corot and Ease by William Harnett
  • Identify in landscapes the horizon line, foreground, and background

Storytelling in Art

  • Identify and describe paintings that show visual stories, such as Snap the Whip by Winslow Homer
  • Describe an artist's source of inspiration
  • Learn about the lives of Winslow Homer and Faith Ringgold and the characteristics of their works

A World of Art: The Roman Empire through the Middle Ages

  • Identify and describe characteristics of art and architecture from ancient Rome and medieval Europe, such as the Column of Trajan from Rome, Byzantine mosaics, and Gothic cathedrals

A World of Art: Islam, Mexico, and Africa

  • Identify and describe characteristics of Islamic, Mexican, and African art and architecture, such as the Alhambra in Spain, a turquoise pectoral from Mexico, and a Benin mask from Africa

A World of Art: China and Japan

  • Identify and describe characteristics of Chinese and Japanese art and architecture, such as scrolls from China and Japan, and the Himeji Castle from Japan
back to top

Number of Lessons and Scheduling

45 minutes

Total Lessons: 72

back to top

 

K12 Scope & Sequence documents for each course include:

  • Course Overview (as seen above)
  • Course Outline
  • Lesson Time and Scheduling