OTH036: Gothic Literature

This list is representative of the materials provided or used in this course. Keep in mind that the actual materials used may vary, depending on the school in which you are enrolled, and whether you are taking the course as Independent Study.

For a complete list of the materials to be used in this course by your enrolled student, please visit MyInfo. All lists are subject to change at any time.

Scope & Sequence : Scope & Sequence documents describe what is covered in a course (the scope) and also the order in which topics are covered (the sequence). These documents list instructional objectives and skills to be mastered. K12 Scope & Sequence documents for each course include:

Course Overview

Since the eighteenth century, Gothic tales have influenced fiction writers and fascinated readers. This course focuses on the major themes found in Gothic literature and demonstrates how the core writing drivers produce a suspenseful environment for readers. It presents some of the recurring themes and elements found in the genre. As they complete the course, students gain an understanding of and an appreciation for the complex nature of Gothic literature.

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Course Length

One Semester

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Prerequisites

None

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Course Outline

Unit 1: GOTHICA: When Gruesome Is Delicious
Unit 2: FRANKENSTEIN: A Monster Is Born
Unit 3: FRANKENSTEIN: With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility
Unit 4: JEKYLL & HYDE: To Thine Own Self Be True
Gothic Literature Midterm Exam
Unit 5: GOTHIC POETRY: Love from Beyond the Grave
Unit 6: DRACULA: The Blood Is the Life
Unit 7: DRACULA: The Hunter Becomes the Hunted
Unit 8: EDGAR ALLAN POE: The Monsters in Us
Gothic Literature Final Exam

COURSE OBJECTIVES

  • Discuss the definition and specific traits of Gothic literature.
  • Discuss the social and historical factors that influenced the birth of this genre.
  • Examine specific themes typically found in Gothic works.
  • Identify key vocabulary terms related to Gothic literature.
  • Discuss important works from this genre, which exemplify its themes and other traits.
  • Discuss Mary Shelley and the society in which she lived.
  • Identify key vocabulary terms and characters from Frankenstein.
  • Read and understand the preface, letters, and Chapters 1–12 of Frankenstein.
  • Connect the novel with your own personal experiences and/or reactions to its themes.
  • Determine which features of this novel make it fit the Gothic genre.
  • Discuss scientific and medical issues related to the theme of "playing god."
  • Compare the poem "Prometheus" by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe to Frankenstein.
  • Identify key vocabulary terms from Frankenstein and the related readings.
  • Read and understand Chapters 13–25 of Frankenstein.
  • Connect the novel with our own personal experiences and/or reactions to its themes.
  • Discuss Robert Louis Stevenson and his career as an author.
  • Identify key vocabulary terms and characters from The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.
  • Read and understand the 10 chapters of the novel.
  • List and describe the Gothic traits learned in Unit 1 that are found in this novel.
  • Apply themes from Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde to modern society or current events.
  • Identify key poetry vocabulary terms and locate examples of them in these poems.
  • Read and analyze the 1773 ballad “Lenore” by German poet Gottfried August Bürger.
  • Read and analyze the 1836 poem “Porphyria’s Lover” by Robert Browning.
  • Read and analyze the 1906 poem “The Highwayman” by Alfred Noyes.
  • Look for modern examples of other literary works such as songs, poems, stories, or films that are related to the poems in this unit.
  • Discuss Bram Stoker.
  • Identify key vocabulary terms and characters from Dracula.
  • Discuss scientific and social issues of Victorian times that are present in this novel.
  • Discover the geographical differences between nineteenth century Europe and modern Europe.
  • Read and understand Chapters 1–13 of Dracula.
  • Identify key vocabulary terms from Dracula and the related readings.
  • Discuss physiognomy and phrenology and their influence in Bram Stoker's writing.
  • Read the poem "Totentanz" by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe and consider its use of vampiric themes.
  • Read and understand Chapters 14–27 of Dracula.
  • Connect knowledge of Victorian sciences with knowledge of Dracula in a modern-day practical situation.
  • Discuss the life of Edgar Allan Poe.
  • Identify key vocabulary terms from the stories studied in this unit.
  • Read and understand the short story “The Black Cat.”
  • Read and understand the short story “Berenice.”
  • Connect your knowledge of unit vocabulary creatively with Poe’s life and works.
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K12 Scope & Sequence documents for each course include:

  • Course Overview (as seen above)
  • Course Outline
  • Lesson Time and Scheduling